Tag Archives: american trail

Animal Kingdom’s Halloween – part II

Wolf Crystal cautiously examines her Halloween treat. Photo credit: Smithsonian’s National Zoo.

Recently I’ve started volunteering at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo. The new American Trail exhibit opened last Summer, and expecting a flurry of visitors, the Zoo asked for extra help. The goal of American Trail, as one might expect, is to portray animals native to the US,  like beavers, ravens, sea lions, river otters, a bald eagle, and (my favorite) grey wolves.

Last week, American Trail  celebrated its first Halloween. Meanwhile, I was part of  the Boo at the Zoo event, but this time from a different point of view – zoo staff, instead of a visitor. I chose to talk about the bald eagle to a score of power rangers, princesses, iron men, and Marios – who also lined up for my newly-invented “are you a seal or a sea lion?” game.

From my booth in the Zoo’s main path, I could hear the sea lions barking. Where they responding to the children’s philosophical conundrum of “trick or treat”?

Sea lion Sophie has a treat and a toy at the same time. Photo credit: Smithsonian’s National Zoo.

Instead, they were busy investigating their own Halloween treats. A collection of photos of the animals and their pumpkins has been posted to the zoo’s Facebook page. Besides being cute and hilarious, the Halloween treats serve the important purpose of enrichment. I’ve talked about this strategy on the blog before, which is an attempt to encourage natural behaviors in captive animals (and some might say, to avoid boredom). Animals will fall back to behaviors they display in the wild, like hunting or scavenging. They exercise their curiosity by investigating the treat (some, like Sophie above and raven Iris, event get a lot of play out of it). Mental abilities are tested as the animals figure out how to open the pumpkin to retrieve the goodies inside.

Selkie feasts on squid she found inside her pumpkin. Photo credit: Smithsonian’s National Zoo.

Grey wolves Crystal and Coby got their share of treats. They were able to scavenge for meat hidden inside their pumpkins. It is only after Hurricane Sandy left that I can reflect on those events – specially considering DC and the National Zoo came out of it mostly unscathed. But in pre-hurricane times, people’s minds were filled with Halloween. And, with the risk of anthropomorphizing, I believe both animals and infant humans had a great time.

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